SHARE UK

Self-harm research

Even though self-harm is common very often people don’t seek any help. As many as half of young people are thought to deal with self-harm alone. SHARE UK want this to change. We need to learn more about self-harm so that we can improve things like the support available in hospitals or in schools. 

For this we need your help. Lots of the research into self-harm takes place in hospitals. This means that people who don’t go to hospital are missed. We want to give everyone a voice. If we know more about what kind of things would help people in the real world we can come up with new ideas and better support. 


ShareUK

 

The dark (or not!) role of the internet

We want to learn more about the good and bad things people find online. For many the idea of self-harm content online conjures images of dark corners of the internet. However, Share UK’s research suggests that this is not always the case. The internet can be a resource offering support and understanding. For many people who feel like they can’t talk to anyone online communities offer support that isn’t available anywhere else. 

Learning more about the good and bad sides of the internet is really important. It is important for doctors and people working in mental health to know more to be able to offer the right kind of help. Researchers can look things up online but this kind of research is rapidly outdated. What we really need is to hear from real people. 

To do this Share UK have set up a Pin-Board style media databank. From here you can upload anything you look at online. This can be anything from blogs, to forums, to news or social media. We want to learn more about the good and the bad and you can upload anything you like. We hope that this research will help with things like guidance on how mental health is written about online or directing people to sources of help. 

 
ShareUK Platform


The Research Register!

One of the most exciting parts of this study is the SHARE UK research register. This gives everyone the chance to sign up to hear more about our research and any studies they might like to take part in. We have made it possible to sign up online and this means that everyone can have a voice taking research out of hospitals and into the world. Over 200 people have already signed up! This is a big step for self-harm research and opens up so many possibilities for the future. If you would like to sign up or learn more visit www.share-uk.co.uk

The Big Data Possibilities

Every time we use the NHS data is collected. This includes everything from seeing a GP to attending A&E. This data helps us learn how to make the health service better, making sure that everyone gets the best care. 

You can help this data go even further by choosing to link SHARE UK data with your anonymised healthcare data. This could help us have a very real impact healthcare. This is all done in complete security and anonymity separating personal data away from everything else so that no one can be personally identified. 

Want to know more? 

We need your help to make a real difference. Your story can help make sure that in the future no one has to face self-harm alone. 

If you are aged 16 or over and would like to learn more or sign up visit www.share-uk.co.uk

 

Want to know more?

‘We need your help to make a real difference. Your story can help make sure that in the future no one has to face self-harm alone.’

If you are aged 16 or over and would like to learn more or sign up visit www.share-uk.co.uk

Resources

You can read more about our recent reviews into self-harm and the internet here http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0181722

And our review on online bullying here 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5934539/

And here 
https://theconversation.com/cyberbullies-are-also-victims-they-need-help-too-91033


Amanda MarchantAmanda Marchant

 

Amanda Marchant

Research assistant

Amanda is a research assistant and PhD student at the Swansea University Medical School. Most of her time is taken up working on Self-Harm Research UK. Her research interests include: child and adolescent mental health, suicide and self-harm and health informatics.